December 26, 2014

Indonesian flying frog tries to hitch a ride on snail's back - @NatGeo

A tiny frog struck up an unlikely friendship with a giant African land snail after clambering onto its shell to catch a ride
A tiny frog struck up an unlikely friendship with a giant African land snail after clambering onto its shell to catch a ride. 

The bright green Wallace's flying frog was spotted giving the snail a quick kiss before it hopped onto its back where it sat for a few minutes.

Photographer Hendy Mp, 25, captured the unusual antics in the woods near his home in Sambas, Indonesia, and sat just 30cm away from the friendly pair while they played. 


'When I came across the cute frog in the woods it was already playing with the little snail,' he said.

'It was hopping about around the snail, it was almost as if he was trying to catch a ride on the back of it.

'I couldn't help but laugh when I saw them, it was very funny. I haven't seen anything else like it.

The bright green Wallace's flying frog was spotted giving the snail a kiss before it hopped onto its back where it sat on top for a few minutes
'Amazingly the snail wasn't phased by the frog trying to get on its back. They both wanted to play together it was really cute.

'It's remarkable that two different types of animal like a frog and snail can become great friends like this.'

Wallace's flying frogs, also known as Abah River flying frog, are found from the Malay Peninsula into western Indonesia and are named after the biologist, Alfred R. Wallace, who collected the first specimen to be formally identified.


As a type of moss frog, they can grow to between 80-100 mm and have long limbs, large eyes and eardrums.

Its fingers and toes are webbed right to the tips and together with a fringe of skin stretching between the limbs, flying frogs can parachute to the forest floor from high in the trees where they are normally found.

They have bright shiny green backs and their undersides are usually white to pale yellow with bright yellow on the outer parts of the toe and finger webbing.

The species of giant African land snail, achatina fulica, is native to east Africa but it has been widely introduced to other parts of the world through the pet trade as a food resource and by accidental introduction.

They feed voraciously and act as a vector for plant pathogens, causing severe damage to agricultural crops and native plants.



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